Change your running form to stop that knee pain

Change your running form to stop that knee pain

If you’re getting knee pain when you run, it’s possible that you’re not doing it right.

Running with bad form can put undue pressure on your joints and could see you having to hang up the trainers altogether. However chances are running isn't the problem. It's simply the way you run.

Here are techniques you can perfect to make sure you don’t damage your knees:

1. Avoid heel strike: Leaning from your ankles can help you make sure your feet are landing under or just behind you when they hit the floor, rather than hitting the ground ahead of your body. If you are constantly overstretching your legs and hitting the ground ahead of you, you’re constantly putting the brakes on and your joints will be absorbing the shock each time.

2. Keep knees bent: Keeping your knees bent and soft, means that you’re not forcing impact onto the joints.

3. Point your feet in the direction of travel: Although this sounds like a fairly obvious technique, many people splay their feet and this can lead to your knee turning out and causing tendons to stretch and the knees will begin to hurt.

4. Keep knees low: Although much of the advice given about running includes keeping the knees up, it’s actually better to keep them swinging low, and instead keep your heels up. Again, it’s to stop you putting the brakes on with every stride.

5. Land on your midfoot: Being aware of which part of the foot hits the ground will help you make sure you are not putting unnecessary pressure on your knees, and helps to avoid knee pain.


The Author

Laura Briggs

Laura is a fitness writer who loves running, strength training, Pilates and Yoga. When she's got time to herself you might find her knitting, or in the kitchen trying out an elaborate recipe - healthy of course!.

Comments

Paula C.
7 August 2017

Paula C.

I have tried incessantly to stop heel striking but I keep reverting to it when I lose concentration. I do suffer from knee pain and run on pavements too. Has anyone tried barefoot trainers to help?

Lucy C.
6 August 2017

Lucy C.

what a useful clear explanation. I'm going to work on these - harder than it sounds but well worthwhile.

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